Urgent Warning: MMS and CDS “Treatments”

Posted in: Alerts, General- Nov 10, 2014 No Comments

In the four years I’ve been  Director of AutismUAE, I’ve seen some dangerous, disgusting, and unethical approaches to “curing” our children, but so far nothing  has been as disturbing to me as MMS- a toxic solution of 28% industrial bleach that causes fever, nausea, severe vomitting, dangerously low blood pressure, but not- unfortunately, a cure for autism.

MMS BookMMS stands for “Miracle Mineral Solution,” and is a product of quackery from a man named Jim Humble. Humble does not have any credentials related to autism, chemistry, or even basic biology.  He is not a doctor. He is a former gold miner who “accidentally stumbled across” the formula for MMS while on a prospecting trip to South America when his friend became ill with malaria.  His friend drank a locally prepared “healing tonic,” got better, and Humble then self-published the 2006 e-book which started the bleach-drinking cure.

Humble is  currently the self-appointed archbishop of a non-religious church of his own founding, Genesis2, whose beliefs revolve around good deeds and healing the world with MMS.  According to the third tenant of their belief system:

“We have developed Sacraments using the cleansing waters of our Church, (MMS1, MMS2 and others). As of 23/01/2012, we have 290 Health Ministers in over 60 countries and over 800 Church members using these cleansing waters to bring health to themselves and others.”

Humble follows the traditional quack’s approach of advocating his cure for pretty much all illnesses without regard for the mechanism of the disease.

IFRC Rejects MMS Claims“When people leave here they really know how to use MMS for all things, skin diseases of all kinds, colon problems, how to regenerate the liver, how to treat brain cancers, how to treat babies and pregnant women, and how to treat animals from mice to elephants.

You will be personally taking MMS while here, spraying your skin with powerful solutions of MMS (but won’t hurt you), spraying others’ skin and hair. You will learn to use sprays, baths, IV solutions, MMS gas, soak the feet, and most importantly, the new protocols that in the country of Malawi have cured more than 800 people of HIV plus 40 cancer cases, 50 of feet and leg numbness, 3 heart disease cases, 13 diabetes cases, and many other diseases and problems.”

In order to circumvent first-world bans on MMS as medical product, he works primarily in third world countries and areas with less stringent medical regulations. In most countries, the bleach in MMS is used in textile stripping and industrial water purification.

“You might like to come to a beautiful place to be treated with MMS for your condition. Why not come to the Dominican Republic and have Bishop Jim Humble (that’s me) work with you with whatever condition that you have. I have treated more than 5000 people with MMS. A local medical doctor and local hospitals are also available for your confidence, (but you won’t need them). ” -MMS Newsletter

Parents are being told to mix bleach in their child’s juices, baby bottles- and even administer bleach enemas. Advocates of the treatment claim that your child’s diarrhea, vomitting, increased stimming, and fever are signs that the treatment are working, versus signs that your child is terribly ill and in pain.

Chlorine Dioxide is known to be a severe respiratory and eye-irritant, and users have displayed symptoms consistent with corrosive injuries, such as vomiting, stomach pains, and diarrhea. (Sydney National Herald)

New Zealand woman slips into coma and dies following MMS treatment. http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/3257504/Miracle-chemical-dubbed-a-danger

New Zealand woman slips into coma and dies following MMS treatment.

From one parent to another, if you still want to “bleach” the autism out of your child with industrial chemicals, I have one sincere request. Try it on yourself first. Follow the whole protocol: increase the dosage so that you suffer through the nausea and expected “fever therapy.”  Give yourself enemas with bleach and enjoy the “detox diarrhea.”

And if – and only if – you believe that you are happier, healthier, and perhaps even more neurologically organised after an entire month, and that it is not actually torture,  then give it a go if you must.  But please remember that hurting disabled children is the worst type of bullying, and unless the curative merit of MMS is proven, the risk you take is tantamount to child abuse.

Links:

WebMd: FDA Warning Against Bogus Autism Treatments

FDA Warns Consumers of Serious Harm from Drinking Miracle Mineral Solution (MMS), Product contains industrial bleach

MMS Treatment Banned in Canada

The man who encourages the sick and dying to drink industrial bleach- The Guardian

Bleaching Away What Ails You – Science Based Medicine

International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies strongly dissociates from the claim of a ‘miracle’ solution to defeat malaria

Bonus:

Bonus: In his spare time, Jim Humble self publishes hundred dollar e-books on creating gold using atomic alchemy. Screenshot from his homepage Nov 10, 2014.

Bonus: In his spare time, Jim Humble self publishes hundred dollar e-books on creating gold using atomic alchemy. Screenshot from his homepage Nov 10, 2014.

 

We do things a little differently: Transportation Allowance

Posted in: General- Jan 31, 2011 No Comments
Dear Parents,
There are costs that are typically associated with a child’s ABA program- Assessment, Program Management, Speech and Language Therapy, etc.  So where does Transportation Allowance come in?  Here at AutismUAE, we provide therapists to families for as close to operational cost as possible.  That includes the visas, salaries, accommodation, medical, annual tickets, business licensing fees, etc- we cover it all and provide a service with the goal of making therapy affordable for as many children as possible.  What that doesn’t include is the price of getting therapists from point A to point B.  Here’s why.
We have clients that live right on Dubai Metro lines and some in residential areas of the city accessible only by taxi.  We have clients in Dubai and clients in Abu Dhabi.  It is impossible to come up with a “standard” transportation cost, because there is no “standard” for where you live.  We cannot include the price of transportation in the price of therapy, because the cost of getting a therapist to Bur Dubai is not equal to the cost of getting a therapist to Sharjah, and each family should only have to pay as much or as little is actually required to bring the therapist to their home.
We’d love to hear what you think about this, because the whole reason we’re working is to help bring as much therapy to as many children as we can, as early in their lives as possible.  If you have ideas on how we can achieve this goal better, we’d love to hear from you.
Best Regards,
Zeba Khan
Director, AutismUAE

Empowering Parents: Parent Reviews for Autism Resources in the UAE

Posted in: General- Oct 07, 2009 No Comments

Dear Parents:

We know you are on the front lines of the autism battle- that you struggle daily to get the best care, to find the most accurate information, and provide the best future for your child that you can. We recognize your determination, and we are hoping you can share your experience.

AutismUAE.com is now accepting parent reviews of service providers in the UAE. If you have had a good experience, an educational experience, or even a poor experience, please share it, and we will publish your reviews so that other parents may benefit and learn from them.

To learn about creating your review, please download this document, read the questions, and then email your feedback to editor@autismuae.com. Your reviews will be featured in tandem with the service provider pages, so that parents looking for information will not only get working hours and phone numbers, but also valuable input from your first-hand experience.

Making information about autism and treatment more freely available is one way that we can empower parents and help them make more informed, more educated decisions about their children’s futures. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Best Regards,

AutismUAE.com

(document also available in PDF format)

A Word of Caution About the use of Risperdal

Posted in: General- Sep 09, 2009 1 Comment

Risperdal (risperidone) is being prescribed by local physicians for children with autism, following its approval in 2008 an FDA-approved drug for irritable and aggressive behaviors.  According to the official website of the drug’s manufacturer, “RISPERDAL is approved for the treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder in children and adolescents (ages 5-16 years), including symptoms of aggression, self-injury, tantrums, and quickly changing moods. It is the first and only prescription medication approved by the FDA for this purpose.”(1)

However, a potentially permanent condition called Tardive Dyskinesia (TD) is listed as one side-effect of Risperdal use, and the study, featured on the New England Journal of Medicine, conducted was of too short a duration to measure instances of TD in the children.   “The short period of this trial limits inferences about adverse effects such as tardive dyskinesia.” (2)

TD is a serious, sometimes permanent side effect reported with RISPERDAL and similar medications. TD includes uncontrollable movements of the face, tongue, and other parts of the body.  Additionally, The Miami Herald reported in July of 2005 that several boys in Florida developed lactating breasts after taking Risperdal. (3)

Additionally Janssen, the manufacturer of Risperdal recently admitted that it “misled” health care professionals by downplaying the potentially fatal side effects of the drug including strokes, diabetes, and other potentially fatal complications in 2004. (4)

The Cochrane Collaboration, international not-for-profit and independent organization, dedicated to making up-to-date, accurate information about the effects of healthcare readily available worldwide, concluded  that “Risperidone can be beneficial in some features of autism. However there are limited data available from studies with small sample sizes. In addition, there lacks a single standardised outcome measure allowing adequate comparison of studies, and long-term followup is also lacking. Further research is necessary to determine the efficacy of risperidone in clinical practice.” (5)

AutismUAE cautions parents against the advice of physicians who would prescribe Risperdal for their children, especially if the children are under the age of those covered in the study (5) or do not present any of the symptoms of violence, aggression, or self-injury that Risperdal claims to be beneficial for.  Parents are strongly cautioned against the use of anti-psychotics or anti-depressant medications for children with Autism, and recommend seeking second or third opinions before making a decision about treatment.

(1) Official Risperdal Autism site

(2) The New England Journal of Medicine

(3)(4)  The Washington Post

(5) The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009 Issue 3, Copyright © 2009 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.. The full text of the review is available in The Cochrane Library (ISSN 1464-780X).

How is Autism diagnosed?

Posted in: General- Sep 09, 2009 1 Comment
To qualify for a diagnosis, a person must have a total of six or more items from (1), (2), and (3), with at least two from (1) and one each from (2) and (3):
1. Qualitative impairment in social interaction, manifest by at least two of the following:
A. Marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors, such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body postures and gestures, to regulate social interaction
B. Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
C. Lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest)
D. Lack of social or emotional reciprocity
Qualitative impairment in communication, as manifest by at least one of the following:
A. Delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime)
B. In individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
C. Stereotyped and repetitive use of language, or idiosyncratic language
D. Lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe, or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level
3. Restrictive repetitive and stereotypic patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
A. Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
B. Apparently inflexible adherence to specific nonfunctional routines or rituals
C. Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
D. Persistent preoccupation with parts of objects.
Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:
1. Social interaction
2. Language as used in social communication
3. Symbolic or imaginative play
The disturbance is not better accounted for by Retts Disorder or childhood disintegrative disorder.

Worried about your child?  The simplest way for a parent to determine whether their child may require further screening for autism  is to use the list of criteria from the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition.  It is easy enough for even parents to be able to evaluate their children within a reasonable degree, allowing for further medical assessment and intervention.  The list of criteria is available at the end of this entry.

Additional methods of screening are available, the simplest for toddlers being the Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (CHAT) typically issued by a GP, family physician or pediatrician at the child’s 18 month checkup.  There is also the M-CHAT, or Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers. Both tools are freely available for use and are recommended standards by which to screen.

Beyond screening, the tools for proper assessment and diagnosis are to be used by a trained psychologist and preferably a BCBA- Board Certified Behavioural Analyst.  Some of these tools are the CARSGARS, and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, and the ABLLS test to measure academic capabilities if applicable.

A proper behavioural, developmental, and psychological assessment takes a few hours with the child as well an interview with the parents to determine where the child’s weaknesses, strengths, and problem behaviours lie.  Following the assessment, parents should expect a detailed report as well as an explanation of the results by the clinical psychologist who conducted the assessment.

The American Psychiatric Association guidelines are as follows:

A. To qualify for a diagnosis, a person must have a total of six or more items from (1), (2), and (3), with at least two from (1) and one each from (2) and (3):

1. Qualitative impairment in social interaction, manifest by at least two of the following:

  • A. Marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors, such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body postures and gestures, to regulate social interaction
  • B. Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
  • C. Lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest)
  • D. Lack of social or emotional reciprocity

2. Qualitative impairment in communication, as manifest by at least one of the following:

  • A. Delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime)
  • B. In individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
  • C. Stereotyped and repetitive use of language, or idiosyncratic language
  • D. Lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe, or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level

3. Restrictive repetitive and stereotypic patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:

  • A. Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
  • B. Apparently inflexible adherence to specific nonfunctional routines or rituals
  • C. Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
  • D. Persistent preoccupation with parts of objects.

B. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:

1. Social interaction

2. Language as used in social communication

3. Symbolic or imaginative play

C. The disturbance is not better accounted for by Retts Disorder or childhood disintegrative disorder.

How the “Urine Toxic Metals” Test Is Used to Defraud Patients

Posted in: General- Aug 27, 2009 No Comments
Article reprinted from www.Autism-Watch.org.  Original source here.

By Dr. Stephen Barret, M.D.

Mercury is found in the earth’s crust and is ubiquitous in the environment. Because of this, it is common to find small amounts in people’s urine. The body reaches a steady state in which tiny amounts are absorbed and excreted. Large-scale population studies have shown that the general population has urine-mercury levels below 10 micrograms/liter, with most people between zero and 5 [1]. Similarly, many people circulate trivial amounts of lead.

Urine lead and mercury levels can be artificially raised by administering a scavenger (chelating agent) such as DMPS or DMSA, which attaches to lead and mercury molecules in the blood and forces them to be excreted. In other words, some molecules that would normally recirculate within the body are bound and exit through the kidneys. As a result, their urine levels are artificially and temporarily raised. How much the levels are raised depends on how the test is administered. The standard way to measure urinary mercury and lead levels is by collecting a non-provoked urine sample over a 24-hour period. Because most of the extra excretion takes place within a few hours after the chelating agent is administered, using a shorter collection period will yield a higher concentration.

When testing is performed, the levels are expressed as micrograms of lead or mercury per grams of creatinine (µg/g) and compared to the laboratory’s “reference range.” Several years ago, a well-designed experiment tested workers who had industrial exposure to mercury. The researchers found that provocation with DMSA raised the 24-hour average urine mercury level from 4.3 µg/g before chelation to 7.8 µg/g after chelation [2]. Because most of the extra excretion occurs toward the beginning of the test, it is safe to assume that the provoked levels would have been 2-3 times as high if a 6-hour collection period had been used.

Practitioners who use the urine toxic metals test typically tell patients that provocation is needed to discover “hidden body stores” of mercury or lead. However, the above experiment proved that provocation raises urine levels as much in exposed workers as in unexposed control subjects and that rise is temporary, should be expected, and is not evidence of “hidden stores.”

Doctor’s Data uses a reference range of less than 3 ug/g for mercury and 5 ug/g for lead. Standard laboratories that process non-provoked samples use much higher reference ranges [3], which means that if all other things were equal, Doctor’s Data is far more likely than standard labs to find “elevated” levels. But that’s not all. A disclaimer at the bottom of the above lab report states—in boldfaced type!—that “reference ranges are representative of a healthy population under non-challenge or nonprovoked conditions.” In other words, they should not be applied to specimens that were obtained after provocation. Also note that the specimen was obtained over a 6-hour period, which raised the reported level even higher.  DoctorsData

The management at Doctor’s Data knows that provoked testing artificially raises the urine levels. Yet their report classifies values in the range of 5-10 µg/g as “elevated. The report also states that “no safe reference levels for toxic metals have been established.” Practitioners typically receive two copies of the report, one for the practitioner and one to give to the patient. Very few patients understand what the numbers mean. They simply see “elevated” lead or mercury, and interpret the “no safe levels” disclaimer to mean that any number above zero is a problem. The patient is then advised to undergo “detoxification” with chelation therapy, other intravenous treatments, dietary supplements, or whatever else the practitioner happens to sell.

This advice is very, very, very wrong. No diagnosis of lead or mercury toxicity should be made unless the patient has symptoms of heavy metal poisoning as well as a much higher nonprovoked blood level. And even if the level is in the 30s—as might occur in an unsafe workplace or by eating lead-containing paint—all that is usually needed is to remove further exposure. Chelation therapy is rarely necessary.

Chelation therapy is a series of intravenous infusions containing a chelating agent and various other substances. One form of chelation therapy is occasionally used to treat lead poisoning. However, lead poisoning is rare and has well-established diagnostic criteria. Slight elevations of lead levels are not poisoning and need no treatment because the body will lower them when exposure is stopped. Proper diagnosis of lead poisoning requires symptoms of lead poisoning, not just a slightly elevated level. Acute poisoning is always accompanied by a rise in zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), without which it should not be diagnosed. Chronic poisoning would have severe symptoms that would be obvious to anyone in addition to severely elevated lead (and ZPP) levels.

Doctors who offer chelation therapy as part of their everyday practice typically claim that it is effective against autism, heart disease and many other conditions for which it has no proven effectiveness or plausible rationale [4]. One such case was described in a recent decision by the U.S. Court of Federal Claims which found no credible evidence that childhood vaccinations cause autism. In that case, Colton Snyder underwent chelation therapy after a Doctor’s Data urine test report classified his urine mercury level as “very elevated.” After noting that the urine sample had been provoked (with DMSA) and that provocation artificially increases excretion, the Special Master concluded that a non-provoked test would have placed the result in the normal range. He also noted:

The medical records, including reports from Mrs. Snyder, reflected that Colten did poorly after every round of chelation therapy. . . . The more disturbing question is why chelation was performed at all, in view of the normal levels of mercury found in the hair, blood, and urine, its apparent lack of efficacy in treating Colten’s symptoms, and the adverse side effects it apparently caused [5].

In March 2009, Arthur Allen tried to interview an official at Doctor’s Data but received no response to his request. However, he did manage to talk with someone at the company who said that the lab was doing about 100,000 of the tests per year. When he asked about the reference range problem, he was told there was no way to establish a reference range for provoked speciments, because provocation might be done with various chelating agents, at varying doses. “The tests are ordered by physicians, so they can interpret the results,” the employee said. “They do what they want with this information.” [6]

Despite provocation, the toxic urine test report sometimes shows no elevated levels. But that doesn’t deter the doctors who are intent on chelating children. They simply tell parents that the children have trouble excreting heavy metals and the test may not detect “hidden stores.” In other words, no matter what the test shows, they still recommend chelation.

Regulatory Actions

At least four state licensing boards have been concerned about the issue of provoked urine testing as a prelude to chelation.

  • Connecticut has included a provoked testing ban in settlement agreements with two practitioners. In 2005, Robban Sica, M.D., signed a consent order under which she was prohibited from using a provoked test to diagnose heavy metal toxicity [7]. In 2006, George Zabrecky, D.C., was ordered to stop all testing that might be preliminary to chelation therapy [8].
  • In 2006, Washington’s Bureau of Medical Quality Assurance charged Stephen L. Smith,M.D., with unprofessional conduct for relying on unreliable tests that included a urine toxic metals test. In 2007, he was ordered to pay a $5,000 fine and undergo a practice evaluation [9].
  • In 2007, Tennessee suspended the license of Joseph E. Rich, M.D., after concluding that he had mismanaged the care of 15 patients, including three who were chelated after undergoing a provoked urine test. [10].
  • In 2007, the North Carolina Medical Board charged Rashid A. Buttar, M.D., with exploiting four patients by charging exorbitant fees for worthless tests and treatments. At a 2008 hearing Buttar indicated that he recommends chelation for nearly all patients who consult him and routinely uses the urine toxic metals testing to evaluate them.

In 2004, CIGNA HealthCare Medicare Administration, which processes Medicare claims for Idaho, North Carolina, and Tennessee, issued a “Progressive Correction Action Review” which concluded that many claim submissions for chelation therapy had been inappropriate. This conclusion was documented by a study of 40 claims which found that in many cases, “heavy metal toxicity” was inappropriately diagnosed and no need for chelation with edetate calcium disodium was documented. The review criticized provoked testing and noted that it does not provide a basis for diagnosing past or current poisoning [11].

I believe that several agencies can and should do something to stop the fraud. If the FDA has jurisdiction over the software used to generate the test reports, it could ban its use. State licensing boards could prohibit the use of provoked testing and discipline practitioners who use it. State laboratory licensing agencies could prohibit testing of provoked specimens or order Doctor’s Data to raise its reference ranges and to stop comparing provoked test results to these non-provoked ranges. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Division of Laboratory Services can also ban the testing of provoked specimens. In addition, all of these agencies can and should issue public warnings.

The Bottom Line

The urine toxic metals test described above—whether provoked or not—is used to persuade patients they are toxic when they are not. I recommend avoiding any practitioner who uses it. If this test has been used to trick you, please send me an e-mail describing what happened and include your phone number.

References

  1. Baratz RS. Dubious mercury testing. Quackwatch, Feb 19, 2005.
  2. Frumkin H. Diagnostic chelation challenge with DMSA: A biomarker of long-term mercury exposure? Environmental Health Perspectives 109:167–171, 2001.
  3. Brodkin E and others. Lead and mercury exposures: interpretation and action. Canadian Medical Association Journal 176:59-63, 2007.
  4. Green S. Chelation therapy: Unproven claims and unsound theories. Quackwatch, July 24, 2007.
  5. Vowell DK. Decision. Snyder v Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. In the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, Office of Special Masters. Case No. 01-162V, filed Feb 12, 2009.
  6. Allen A. Treating autism as if vaccines caused it: The theory may be dead, but the treatments live on. Slate, April 1, 2009.
  7. Consent order. In re: Robban Sica, M.D. , Connecticut Board of Health Petition No. 2002-0306-001-043, Feb 15, 2005.
  8. Consent order. In re: George Zabrecky, D.C., Connecticut Board of Chiropractic Examiners Petition No. 2003-0109-007-001, Nov 16, 2006.
  9. First amended statement of charges. In the matter of the license to practice as a physician and surgeon of Stephen L. Smith, M.D. Washington Department of Health, Bureau of Medical Quality Assurance, Docket No. 05-01-A-1038MD, Filed Jan 3, 2006.
  10. Final order. In the matter of Joseph Edward Rich before the Tennessee Board of Medical Examiners, Docket No. 17.18-073557A, Dec 21, 2007.
  11. CIGNA HealthCare Medicare Administration. Progressive correction action review,Nov 28, 2004

This article was revised on April 29, 2009.

Hello, Salaam, Ahlan Wa Sahlan

Posted in: General- Aug 17, 2009 No Comments

AutismUAEWelcome to AutismUAE.com. You may be a professional who works with children on the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the parent of a child with autism, or a concerned family member or friend who is looking for information- whatever you are, you are in the right place.

AutismUAE will exist to feature the latest news about Autism and diagnosis, information about therapy options, reviews of treatment providers in the UAE, and resources for parents and professionals of all nationalities.

AutismUAE is not pro-biomedical or anti-biomedical. We are seekers of truth, research, and the best, proven therapies that can aid a child’s ability to learn, grow, and blossom as an individual with unique needs.

AutismUAE is currently under construction, and will be updated and populated with articles and resources as we go along. Comments and suggestions are welcome.

Welcome,
-Editor, Autism UAE